The Literary Lancashire Awards: The Runners Up

The winning entries from the Literary Lancashire Award

The Literary Lancashire Award is a creative writing competition, launched this year by SCAN’s very own Lara Orriss and Ruth Walbank. The competition spans the whole of Lancashire, open to those aged 16-30 years old. For the first year the competition did remarkably well, receiving 80 total entries in the two categories, poetry and prose. Here are exerpts of the runners up…

PROSE CATEGORY

Disconnect by Hannah Wesson

TECHNOLOGY OF TOMORROW

“It’s the craziest thing, I never used to like strawberries, but these are amazing.”

Lucy laboured a smile as Peter devoured his waffles. Crisp, golden waffles smothered in white chocolate sauce, delicately sliced strawberries all topped with crumbled biscuit. Carol’s recommendation.

“How’s yours?” Peter asked with his mouth full.

Lucy shrugged. “Amazing as always.” Bananas and toffee sauce, she’d barely made a dent. Peter finished the last bite and started scooping up the dregs with his finger. “Not hungry?”

“I mean…technically no, we never are.”

Peter gave her a look. “Alright smart arse, you know what I mean.”

Lucy smiled weakly. “Yeah. Guess I’m just not in the mood for waffles right now.”

A mans life structured in a way a specific way that leads to such a freedom pathetic by Sam Pye

NORMAL AND THE ABNORMAL

I

Am a person                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                              that exists

In England

                                                                                                                               A place

And my name is not important

                                                                                                                     Stop asking questions

                                                                                                                                                God

I often ask myself what it means to be a man because the news stories and online blogs and people that I know

                                                                                                                                        I know people always have such specific conditions that I should abide because that is what it means to be a man

Man

M

                                                                                A

                                                                                                                                                                 N

Do you think adam

                                                                                                                                             Another name

Cared about what people thought of him

Do you

think about it for a second

POETRY CATEGORY

Slagheap by Alex George

TECHNOLOGY OF TOMORROW

Oh God,

I may be in the last wave of people to crash against the Earth’s shoreline.

I may be the last to crack my skull on a box-TV thrown to the pile when Blockbuster died.

I may be the last to choke on the bike-chain lasso that flares from the dirt.

Oh God.

If I am caught in the final landslide of tin foil and fish-heads,

Give me strength to bite my blue hand from six-pack plastic.

And when the bottle-green screams come tumbling through my blood,

Permit me to smash the music into my squint,

And like a dog,

Plunge my head into the gramophone of death

And-

Oh God-

Know that I am extinct

And I was the last disc to be scratched.

Mrs and Mrs Reanimator by Rhiannon Hughes

TECHNOLOGY OF TOMORROW

Honey, you know I miss you, in those

Overnight shifts that see you holed up

In your laboratory; deft hands

Tinkering with God-knows-what while I

Wait here in lonely silence, sprawled out

Like a dead frog for you to dissect.

You’ve changed, my love, and I know that change

Is inevitable in your field.

But had an experiment gone wrong;

Turned you into some grotesque, gorgeous

Parody of the woman I’d loved,

Maybe I could learn to love with that.

I wasn’t afraid when you came home,

Still frothing about the committee

Cutting your funding, your mutters of

They’ll see. They’ll all see! filling the house.

You were swallowed by your work that night.

The passion I’d once loved devoured you.

Does being a wonder of modern

Technology get lonely, dearest?

Does the brain between those bolts still dream

Of kisses shared under bleach-blue lights,

Whispered promises of things that God

Had not yet permitted to exist?

Winning entries can be read in the first issue of SCAN, published in September at the start of the next academic year. The LLA anthology containing all shortlisted pieces will be available for purchase soon from Waterstones King St, Lancaster at £8 or £15 for two copies.

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